No indictment for NYPD officer…so here comes the anti-cop protests

Posted by on December 7, 2014
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eric

On Wednesday, a Staten Island grand jury chose not to indict an NYPD officer for using a chokehold move that killed Eric Garner, adding more fuel to the race-baiting fires lit across the nation.

Garner died on July 17 after he resisted arrest while officers attempted to handcuff him for selling loose untaxed cigarettes, commonly referred to on the New York City streets as “Loosies”.  This fatal encounter was caught on video by numerous witnesses, showing the NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo putting Garner in a “chokehold”, a move that is prohibited by the NYPD’s policies and procedures but not banned nationally. Garner’s last words were “I can’t breathe” as it was heard numerous times on the video, words which can be seen as a ploy to get the officers to free him from restraint and try to attack.

Police are not barred by the law from using a “chokehold” during an arrest, but it’s a violation of the NYPD’s regulation policy. Medical examiners ruled the cause of death to be a “homicide” – a word used in clinical, not legal terms – based on the compression of the neck and chest, and prone positioning during physical restraint by police. However, the autopsy also attributed Garner’s death to his heart disease and asthma caused by his obesity.

Garner was certainly no saint himself. He had multiple encounters with the police, having been arrested on 31 occasions, and he most likely knew what he was doing was unlawful. For this instance, he was on the street selling untaxed cigarettes, which in this Nanny state is considered to be against the law.
Before the altercation, Garner shouts with the officers, “This stops today” as he struggles with officers to prevent being restrained. That right there tells you there is at least a question of whether the arresting officers’ lives were at stake. As he fights arrest, the officer begins to wrap his arm around Garner’s neck and under his arm. Garner, a  6’3, 350-pound man struggles, and is put to the ground.
Was Garner choked to death as the media and the race baiters make it appear? Or was Garner in poor health and should have known better than to resist arrest.  If Garner was healthy, would he have died from the officer “chokehold”?  Cardiac arrest was the subdue reason for his death, not the “chokehold”. Could it have been the heavy government overburden laws that Garner didn’t follow, resulting in the officers having to do their job since it’s the law?  Too many questions with emotional non factual answers. So here it is…

The 23-member Grand Jury viewed the video and the medical examiner’s report that was used as evidence to determine not to indict the officer. They decided to not indict with the video evidence and medical examiner’s report that ruled the death a homicide. They voted that the officer didn’t break the law.  They concluded the officer’s action showed no intent to harm and it was an unnecessary death due to Garner resisting arrest. They felt that Garner resisted arrest and the officer was doing his job with no intention to kill. Had Garner just followed the officers command, it would have been a different story.

cops
Cops have a tough job. Period. They deal with people who hate them and are obnoxious to them, but always answer the call of these hypocrites when needed. Learn from this – if a cop is trying to arrest you and you resist, something may or will go wrong. Police don’t wake up everyday to go to work trying to kill anybody, let alone to kill a black man. At the end of the day we should be thanking them for keeping our city safe and protecting us. We should not be listening to the race baiting-money making-tax owing individuals such as Rev. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson.

Enough with the cop bashing.

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Mona Salama

Social Media Director / Journalist at ANM News
Mona Salama is a journalist and Social Media Director for ANM News. A young Republican by way of New York City, Mona is a Grad Student studying Public Policy and Administration at John Jay College. A self-described “girl who loves politics”, Mona is also as a political consultant and operative in NYC. She is well versed in field operations and strategies, working for numerous campaigns in the past four years.

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